Poems About Sports

Poetry is such a beautiful and emotional thing. Poems about sports has always fascinated me endlessly. Each of these poems are about several different sports and paint such fabulous pictures, regardless of whether or not you like the sports, you can’t help but respect the poems. So without further ado, here are some of my favorites about sports.

1. A Boy Juggling A Soccer Ball

This poem has such gorgeous and descriptive imagery while describing this seemingly simplistic event. It’s just a boy juggling a soccer ball, nothing outrageously interesting, but the language used turns it into something much more respectable and fantastic.

2. Slam, Dunk, and Hook

I love this poem because it makes a game of pickup basketball about so much more than just that. It uses great descriptive language that captures the fun that can come from just playing a simple game of basketball with your best friends, while you go through events in your personal events at the same time. It makes me want to get my friends together and just play the game and make memories.

3. Fast Break

“A hook shot kisses the rim and hangs there, helplessly, but doesn’t drop,” I love this line because it really puts us in the shoes of somebody playing the game of basketball, in the present tense. We can feel all of the sights and sounds around the boy. Poetry is really a beautiful thing because it takes the most simple words and spins it into something more complicated and striking.
This is a very long poem and reads more like a story. But it holds up as a poem due to the structure. I love how the story flows in such a unique way that makes it all the more memorable. It’s filled with words, I typically enjoy poems that are much shorter than this one is. But something about this poem still makes it work and stick out in my mind as being one of the better sports poems.
Could I really talk about famous sports poem and leave this one off? It’s by far the most famous poem on the subject and it’s become a type of pop culture phenomenon. There’s an interesting cast of characters that fill the lines of this incredible poem. It also takes you through many different emotions. It’s odd how easily he’s able to get you emotionally invested and just caught up in the story. Basically, the question most fitting for me to ask is, who doesn’t love this one?

Best Sports Articles

There’s something special about sports articles. To be a good one, the reporter has to be involved in the lives of the athletes. These authors in the following magazine articles went above and beyond that expectation and wrote some of the best articles of all time.

1. Crime and Punishment by Gary Smith

By far my favorite piece of sports writing of all time. Richie Parker was a high school basketball player who found his dreams of being a college basketball player shattered when one moment beneath the school stairwells changed everything. The interesting thing about this story is how everything affects everything. It didn’t just change Richie’s life, it changed the lives of journalists, principals, coaches, and other authority figures. It’s written in such a flawless way and you get wrapped up in the lives of every character.

2. Life goes on for Lance Armstrong by Rick Reilly

This story is heartbreaking and personal. Reilly went above and beyond the call of duty by following Lance Armstrong around and also defending him against steroid allegations for years. The story uncovers a lot of information and you can’t help but sympathize with Rick Reilly.

3. The Final Walk-Off by J.R. Moehringer

Derek Jeter is one of the best baseball players my generation has seen. I love how in-depth and thoughtful this story really is. It’s a terribly long article but it’s worth the read. I’ve never been a big fan of Jeter as a person but this story was able to shed a light on how awesome the baseball player actually is.

4. In The Nick of Time by Rick Bragg

Despite the totally awful pun, the title and the article gives us serious insight on how much the state of Alabama needed Nick Saban. It’s crazy to me how obsessed these fans are. But football is really the big thing that gets people together in the state. Saban was able to satisfy the people of Alabama by his arrival. It’s a fascinating story filled with many quotations and personal stories.

5. The Left Arm of God by Tom Verducci

I love the story of the legendary pitcher Sandy Koufax. So naturally, this story really appealed to me. In my humble opinion, the introduction to this story is by far one of the best I’ve ever read. It paints such a vivid picture for you of a man who’s no longer a star, he’s just like an ordinary guy who doesn’t get much attention.

6. Heroes For Sale by Brin-Jonathan Butler

This is a lovely profile of a former Cuban boxer who proved that money isn’t the most important thing in life. This Cuban boxer, Teófilo Stevenson, once said, “What is a million dollars compared to the love of eight million people?” Stevenson was one of the few boxers who was able to stand a chance against Ali. The profile does a great job at connecting the boxer with the number one most famous Cuban athlete Yasiel Puig and both of them with Cuba in general.

7. Federer As Religious Experience by David Foster Wallace

David Foster Wallace is one of the best authors I’ve ever read. He doesn’t just scratch the surface of what he writes about, he digs in as deep as he can possibly get. He’s known more for his essay on lobster and his classically long book, “Infinite Jest.” Beyond that, he was also an amazing sportswriter. More specifically, he was a beautiful writer about tennis. He was a serious tennis player growing up and it’s clear he knows a lot about this sport that he loves. This essay provides us with a perspective about Federer that we’ve never looked at before.

8. Higher Education by Gary Smith

Gary Smith tells the story of a black basketball coach teaching in Ohio’s Amish country. This story goes beyond basketball and creates empathy within the readers. It also is the rare type of story that causes us to actually put ourselves in the characters shoes. Just read how perfect this sentence right here is, “They knew in their bones how small his wrath was, held up against his love.” It’s simple yet beautiful and compelling.

9. Special Team by Rick Reilly

No story could be more heartwarming as this one. Rick Reilly tells a story about Chy Johnson, a girl from the small town of Queen Creek Arizona who was being bullied at school. This quote explains it all, “Chy’s brain works at only a third-grade level because of a genetic birth defect, but she knew enough to feel hate.” Her mom noticed how sad her daughter seemed to be so she contacted the starting quarterback on the school’s football team, he and the other football players began a beautiful friendship that is extremely touching.

10. Mutant by Luke Dittrich

Usain Bolt is the fastest man on the planet. This profile of him is the best I’ve read. It goes deeper into what motivates this athlete and it gets personal – maybe too personal but it’s still insanely detailed. This is a must read for all of you that have heard his name but don’t know his story.

 

 

10 Quick Tips On Cramming

Cramming is something that chronic procrastinators are forced to do. Studying for any test in college can be overwhelming and waiting until the last minute isn’t the smartest decision. However, many of us just get busy and forget to study ahead of time. Here are some tips for those of you that are currently cramming for a big college exam.

1. Get some sleep

Prep up as much as possible before you sit down and study consistently for X number of hours. You’ll need energy if you want to study for long periods of time.

2. Make sure to eat

Try to get your energy up by eating at least a snack. Don’t skip any meals, make sure you’re getting the nutrition that you need as much as possible.

3. Highlight what you need

Make sure you single out the important points in the chapter or whatever you’re reviewing for. Don’t just study the whole chapter again and again, make sure you talk back to the text. Ask questions about what you don’t understand.

4. Make a practice exam

Read and answer the questions at the end of each chapter. Looking over these and analyzing how it’s set up is important. You can follow that before you make questions for a practice test. A practice test will help you prepare properly for the upcoming exam.

5. Type your notes

If you have handwritten notes, typing them helps. Looking over these will help you review as you type them up. Taking handwritten notes is important because it helps you retain information while you’re in class. This is a strategy I recommend trying.

6. Review graded assignments/quizzes/tests

Look over what you got wrong and do your best to see what you did wrong. Looking over this several times will help you retain this information and remember the right answers.

7. Work in the library

You need a quiet studying space and what spot is better than the library? It’s quiet and has a positive environment where you can get your work done with minimal distractions. Probably a lot better than any dorm will be.

8. Breathe!

This is an obvious yet one that we sometimes forget. When we’re under a lot of stress, we can forget to breathe. So just relax and keep on breathing as you get through this intense study session.

9. Have study buddies

Having a group to study with can be extremely effective if you stay on task. It can be fun to have someone else there to quiz you and to share ideas with. Just make sure your able to focus on studying only!

10. Use flashcards

Making your own flashcards on the particular subject your studying for is a strategy that pretty much always works. Make sure that the flashcards are filled with necessary information. You can use any other strategies to help you remember the information but this is probably the most common and effective one I can come up with. Then just keep on quizzing yourself and you’ll retain the information in no time!

Books That Teach You Something

I’m a total book nerd, I’ll admit it. These are some of the books that have taught me many facts about the world. I take these lessons and recall them on a fairly frequent basis. Who said learning wasn’t fun??

Freakonomics by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner

Freakonomics-Cover

 

Pretty much everything I’ve learned, I’ve learned from this book. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve brought up an interesting statistic that I learned from this book ever since I first read it. Yeah, it’s pretty much useful information but it’s cool information that you’re going to love and bring up quite frequently in your day to day conversations.

What If? by Randall Munroe

comics-what-if-randall-munroe-01

My dad introduced me to this really cool book by former NASA worker Randall Munroe. Munroe started this comic called xkcd which is a hilarious scientific look at the world. He also started answering questions that were sent to him which adapted into this book. Questions include: What would happen if you tried to hit a baseball pitched at 90% speed of light? And also, what if everyone in the world just had one soul mate – one random person somewhere in the world? Could they ever meet? These are weird questions but it’s interesting to here his scientific and illustrated responses.

Rules For Writers by Diana Hacker

This is a key tool for college students. Basically any college paper that you have to write is going to be in MLA or APA format and this book takes you through all of that. Sure, OWL Purdue is pretty handy with MLA as well, but Rules For Writers is something that you can easily flip through and also offers tons of grammar lessons that you may need a refresher on. It also has helpful little quizzes throughout which are all really awesome.

On Writing by Stephen King

On Writing is a helpful non-fiction novel from the successful horror writer Stephen King. Not only do we learn more about the writer himself, but we also get a look inside what works best for him and different methods that you may not be too familiar with. I found this book particularly fascinating and I really love it.

Now I Know by Dan Lewis

I actually subscribe to Now I Know’s daily newsletter. You can always count on the facts that Dan Lewis comes up with to be intriguing and to teach you a thing or two about the world in general. It’s all really fascinating and I commend Lewis for spending so much time collecting these facts and sharing them in a cool way with the rest of the world.

The Book Of General Ignorance by John Mitchinson

There aren’t many books that are witty and hilarious like this one. Author John Mitchinson informs readers that the book will set you up to win Jeopardy! or Who Wants To Be A Millionaire? And that is very much true. I appreciate all of these facts because they are so random yet you learn so much about the world and stuff that you were unknowingly super ignorant to for all these years.

The History Buff’s Guide to the Presidents

I love and recommend all of the books in the History Buff’s series. However, I had to shout out to this one in particular because I love all of the trivia and facts it taught me. Now I know a lot more about the U.S. Presidents and I think this guide stands out from the other one due to its easy to read format and how it manages to keep your attention the entire time.

 

March Theme: Education

Happy March! Wow, I can’t believe it’s already March. It feels like January was just yesterday but now it’s halfway through the spring semester and that’s insane to me. March marks many different things: warm weather, breaks, and it also gets us closer to the end of this school year. This month is going to be about education and will hopefully have some tips that you guys will find helpful tips to bring us to the end of the semester. Besides an academic education, I will also provide recommendations for what to binge watch on Netflix and all that jazz.

End Of The Month & Introducing March

The month has been all about love and the different types that we find. I didn’t get too personal here but I hope that my recommendations are helpful to you! I’ll talk more about March and what all to expect tomorrow. But I just wanted to share some of my ideas here now. March has a whole week of spring break which I’ll talk about a lot in my posts. The main theme is just going to be education. Some important things to learn, guides, lists, all that sort of stuff. There will also be a lot of recommendations that I find helpful and hopefully you will enjoy.

Call For Submissions

Hey lovely people!
Thank you for reading my blog. Whether it’s your first visit or your tenth, I hope you enjoy what I have to say here. My mission is simply to share my love and passion for pop culture, movies, music, and books with anyone who will read it. I’m looking for submissions for the month of March. The theme is going to be loss including: loss of loved one, pet, friends, self, and whatever else you can come up with! I decided to make this my theme because recently, my grandpa passed away. He was the nicest guy I’ve ever had the pleasure of meeting and I’m grateful to have had the opportunity to have in my life at all. I’m going to continue missing him and I felt like I should write about this experience and share books, movies, and TV shows I love that explores the different kinds of loss. I want to hear your stories about loss because I’m just one person and so it’ll become repetitive if I keep sharing my own wrestle with loss. It would mean the world to me if you emailed your stories about loss. If you’d rather not send anything personal that’s okay, I’ll take any pop culture recommendations on the topic or whatever else you can come up with! There’s no particular guidelines or word count, just send me anything and everything. Send ideas or completed stories to geigergirl96@gmail.com
Thank you so much!
Rachel