Personal Relationship With Sports

Why do I care about sports at all? That’s a complicated question to really answer. Well, first of all, I am not an athletic person. I’ve never played sports but I’ve grown up with them all my life. My brother played basketball, baseball, football, and wrestling. I grew up at the baseball fieldĀ as a little girl. I used to bring my Barbie backpack and a few Barbies to get me through the ball games. It wasn’t something I cared about back then but now the sport is something I love.

Football was another sport I didn’t understand as a little girl watching her older brother play in the pee wee football games. My brother wasn’t bad but I was about 2 or 3 years old and truthfully, I couldn’t pick out which one was my brother. Years later, I started watching football for the first time. It took me awhile to make it through the whole game since I’d get so restless. I watched the games in full at home and I fell in love with the sport.

A lot of sports fans are those that at least have some athleticism. I have pretty much none and absolutely no sports background except for a year of basketball and a year of track. I am not coordinated and I was always picked last in gym class. But it when it comes to knowing what I talk about and making decent plays, I’ve always been able to do that. I think some people have a brain for sports while some have an ability for sports, some have both. I’m more of just a brain kind of person. But I’m okay with that and I’ll continue to share my love for many different sports as many chances I get.

There’s something beautiful about the way each game is played and also something interesting and awesome about the stories. They never get old to me and maybe you don’t feel that way, but this is my story. Maybe you don’t get why I chose to blog about sports this month but I hope this will give you some background and context about what I do.

Book of the Month: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

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A book that most represents my theme of change for this month happens to be this 2003 release from British writer Mark Haddon. The book is narrated by a 15-year-old boy with Autism who is fascinated with Sherlock Holmes. He becomes fixated on the fictional detective to the point where he makes everything a mystery he has to solve. The main character Christopher, is used to his routine and he becomes anxious when anything doesn’t go according to plan. What I love about this novel is how honest it is. You get to see life through the eyes of someone who’s struggling with something he doesn’t fully understand. He’s not content with who he is but he can’t change it either.

This novel says a lot about change and really puts things into perspective. Autism is something that no one has the ability to control, it’s just something that happens. Since we only see it through his eyes, we don’t get to see firsthand what the other characters in the book think about him and the problems that happen due to his actions. Christopher obviously has to deal with change in his life since we all do. His is just extremely difficult for him to deal with considering his condition.

Beyond the basic concepts of the novel, it also looks at how a change of pace can be really difficult to deal with. We have to cope with things and learn how to accept them as much as we can. Christopher has to deal with the change happening in his life and he has his fair share of encounters with things he doesn’t understand. Such as, him getting blamed for murdering his neighbor’s dog and having an altercation with an officer after due to him reacting since he was afraid. The interesting thing about this particular character is his approach to resorting to Sherlock Holmes mode and playing real life detective. He’s a seriously smart character that we can all take a lesson or two from.